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Thinking About Moving to Another State? Don’t Forget About Taxes.

  • June 2019 | by Abbott Pratt & Associates

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    This week we were meeting with a client who recently changed his residency and left New England to settle down in the Sunshine State. Like our client, a change of residency may be a common discussion in your household, especially as you approach retirement. Don’t forget to factor state and local taxes into the equation- not just warmer weather when making your decision.

    Identify all applicable taxes

    It may seem like a no-brainer to simply move to a state with no personal income tax. But, to make a good decision, you must consider all taxes that can potentially apply to a state resident. In addition to income taxes, these may include property taxes, sales taxes and estate taxes.

    If the states you’re considering have an income tax, look at what types of income they tax. Some states, for example, don’t tax wages but do tax interest and dividends (NH).

    Watch out for state estate tax

    The federal estate tax currently doesn’t apply to many people. For 2019, the federal estate tax exemption is $11.4 million ($22.8 million for a married couple). But some states levy estate tax with a much lower exemption and some states may also have an inheritance tax in addition to (or in lieu of) an estate tax (MA only gives a $1million Exemption).

    Establish domicile

    If you make a permanent move to a new state and want to escape taxes in the state you came from, it’s important to establish legal domicile in the new location. The definition of legal domicile varies from state to state. In general, your domicile is your fixed and permanent home location and the place where you plan to return, even after periods of residing elsewhere.

    How do you establish domicile in a new state? The more time that elapses after you change states and the more steps you take to establish domicile in the new state, the harder it will be for your old state to claim that you’re still domiciled there for tax purposes. Some ways to help lock in domicile in a new state are to:

    • Buy or lease a home in the new state and sell your home in the old state (or rent it out at market rates to an unrelated party),
    • Change your mailing address at the post office,
    • Change your address on passports, insurance policies, will or living trust documents, and other important documents,
    • Register to vote, get a driver’s license and register your vehicle in the new state, and
    • Open and use bank accounts in the new state and close accounts in the old one.

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